CHEM 105 – General Chemistry I

Fall 2019

Instructor:

Office:

E-mail:

Phone:

Office Hours:

Course Credit Hours:

Lectures:

Dr. F. Gregg McIntosh

Sims 109F

mcintoshg@winthrop.edu

803-323-4917

T/Th 12:30-1:30 pm or by appointment (I am also usually available during Common Meeting Time on T/Th, 11-12:15)

4

Section 002: Tuesday/Thursday 8:00-9:15 am / SIMS 105




Required Materials:

●    Text: OpenStax Chemistry digital text. https://openstax.org/details/books/chemistry-atoms-first

●    A scientific calculator with logarithms and exponential functions (cell phones may NOT be used).



Course Goals:

●   Gain an understanding of the fundamental concepts of chemistry.
●    Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
●    Build a foundation of good study habits and knowledge for more advanced scientific studies.
●    Better understand how science and chemistry relate to the world around us.

University Level Competencies:

●   Competency 1: Winthrop graduates think critically and solve problems.
●   Competency 2: Winthrop graduates are personally and socially responsible.
●   Competency 3: Winthrop graduates understand the interconnected nature of the world and the time in which they live.
●   Competency 4: Winthrop graduates communicate effectively


General Education Requirements

Chem 105 fulfills three hours of general education requirement for natural sciences. The writing requirements will be fulfilled through quizzes, exams, and the final cumulative exams. Students will be required to demonstrate an organized and logical approach to problem solutions. The solutions must show and understanding of the fundamental concepts, and use mathematical operations, unit conversions, and proper significant figures in order to determine the proper answers.
Listed below are the seven fundamental student learning outcomes for natural science courses as well as examples of how they will be fulfilled in Chem 105.

Students should be:

1. Conversant with a few fundamental concepts from among the three main areas of natural science, including earth, life, and physical sciences. (e.g., chemical reactions, conservation of mass,...)

2. Able to apply the scientific methodologies of inquiry. (e.g., Problem solving exercises)

3. Able to discuss the strengths and limitations of science. (e.g., discussion of scientific methodology)

4. Able to demonstrate an understanding of the history of scientific discovery. (e.g., The development of the periodic table and discovery of subatomic particles)

5. Able to discuss the social and ethical contexts within which science operates. (e.g., application of the scientific method).

6. Able to communicate about scientific subjects including the defense of conclusions based on one’s own observations. (e.g., homework assignments and analytic exam questions)

7. Able to discuss the application of scientific knowledge to the social sciences and to non-scientific disciplines. (integrated throughout the course)


 Course Outline:


In this course, we will examine the following topics:

●   Unit Systems and Dimensional Analysis
●    Basic Concepts of Matter
●    Subatomic Particles, Isotopes and Nuclear Chemistry
●    Electronic Structure and Chemical Periodicity
●    Chemical Bonds
●    Chemical Nomenclature
●    Chemical Calculations: The Mole Concept and Chemical Formulas
●    Chemical Calculations Involving Chemical Equations
●    States of Matter
●    Gas Laws
●    Solutions
●    Acids, Bases and Salts
●    Chemical Equations: Net Ionic and oxidation-Reduction
●    Reaction Equilibrium
●    Reaction Kinetics


Class Preparation: You will get more from each lecture video if you spend time preparing ahead of time. Therefore, you should:

●    Read assigned text sections and complete assigned homework before each lecture.  This will give you a better understanding of the topics being discussed and you will be able to take better notes and ask more insightful questions if you need clarification on any of the topics discussed. 

●    Attend class.  If you miss class, it is your responsibility to obtain lecture notes from another student in the class. You are also responsible for any announcements or schedule changes made during class, whether or not you were present. 

●    You are responsible for any announcements made in class, via Blackboard, or by email. Make sure you have access to your Blackboard account, that your correct email is included in the class listserver, and check your email and Blackboard accounts at least once a day for any updates.

●    Devote time to study each day.  This is a rigorous course that requires daily preparation.  Work homework problems daily.

●    Take good notes and develop good study habits. Many students with good work ethics often still need to change how they approach studying for this course. Working problems independently is necessary to improve your comprehension and problem solving skills. Supplemental work with tutors or fellow students can also be advantageous. 

●    Come to class prepared with problems or questions for clarification in order to get the most benefit out of the sessions. 



Exams and Grading:

 



Exams and Quizzes: You will need a scientific calculator (one with exponential notation, logarithms, and orders of operation) for exams and quizzes. 
Use of cell phones and sharing of calculators
are both strictly prohibited during exams and quizzes.

Course Withdraw: October 18 is the last day to withdraw from a full semester course with an automatic N grade issued.  Students may not withdraw from a course after this date without documented extenuating circumstances as determined by the University.

Communication: Information may be sent via Blackboard or the Class List Server. If you added the course late or are not receiving emails, go to http://www.winthrop.edu/technology/default.aspx?id=7081 to add yourself.
If you have any questions, call, e-mail, or see me before/after class to set up an appointment.

Attendance:  You are expected to attend all class meetings. You are responsible for all announcements made in class. Absence or lateness does not excuse you from this responsibility. You are also responsible for any announcements/assignments posted vial blackboard or email, so you should check your email and Blackboard accounts daily.


Students with Disabilities/Need of Accommodations for Access:

Winthrop University is committed to providing access to education.  If you have a condition which may adversely impact your ability to access academics and/or campus life, and you require specific accommodations to complete this course, contact the Office of Accessibility (OA) at 803-323-3290, or, accessibility@winthrop.edu,as early as possible to discuss your concerns.



Academic Success Center: Winthrop’s Academic Success Center is a free resource for all undergraduate students seeking to perform their best academically.  The ASC offers a variety of personalized and structured resources that help students achieve academic excellence, such as tutoring, academic skill development (test taking strategies, time management counseling, and study techniques), and group/individual study spaces.  The ASC is located on the first floor of Dinkins, Suite 106.  Tutoring for this specific course is offered through the office.  If you wish to request a tutor, you must attend ONE Tutee Seminar, offered every Friday until October 19th. Please contact the ASC at 803-323-3929 or success@winthrop.edu if you have any questions.  For more information on ASC services, please visit www.winthrop.edu/success.

 


 

***This document may be adjusted as needed during the semester. The student is responsible for being aware of any changes and so should check the department website, chem.winthrop.edu, prior to every class for changes to this syllabus.

This is a tentative schedule and will be revised as needed.

Class meeting dates:


Text Section/Topics

Read prior to class


Lecture Videos

For captions, select the gear icon (settings), then subtitles, and English

Lecture Presentations
(in OpenOffice and Powerpoint formats)

08/20/19


1.1-1.5


Algebra/exponents
Ch1-Introduction
Ch1-Classification
Ch1-Measurements
Ch1-Significant Figures
Ch1-Sig. Figs.
Examples
Ch1-Conversions
Ch1-Conversions Examples

Ch. 1, ppt

08/22/19


1.16
2.1-2.4


Ch2-Atomic Structure
Ch2-Formulas
Ch2-Isotopes and Avg. Mass
Ch2-Isotopes Examples

Ch. 2, ppt

08/27/19


3.1-3.5


Ch2-Moles
Ch2-Molar Mass
Ch2-Moles Examples
Ch2-Empirical Formulas
Ch3-EM radiation
Ch3-Quantum numbers

Ch. 3ppt

08/29/19


3.6-3.9


Ch3-Electronic configuration
Ch3-El conf examples
Ch3-Other notation examples


09/03/19


3.10-3.11


Ch3-Periodic Table
Ch3-Periodic Trends
Ch3-Per. Trend examples


09/05/19

Exam 1





09/10/19


4.1-4.7


Ch4-Bonding Introduction
Ch4-Ionic nomenclature
Ch4-Covalent compounds
Ch4-Polyatomic ions
Ch4-Ionic cpds examples
Ch4-Covalent cpds examples
Ch4-Polar bonds

Ch. 4, ppt

09/12/19




Ch4-Lewis structures
Ch4-Lewis structure examples
Ch4-Formal charges
Ch4-Formal charges examples
Ch4-Molecular geometry
Ch4-Molecular geometry examples
Ch4-Molecular polarity


09/17/19


5.1-5.3
6.1-2


Ch5-Hybridization
Ch6-Empirical Formulas
Ch6-Concentrations

Ch. 5, ppt
Ch. 6, ppt

09/19/19


7.1-7.3


Ch7-Balancing reactions
Ch7-balancing-examples
Ch7-Electrolytes

Ch. 7, ppt

09/24/19


7.4


Ch7-Types of Reactions
Ch7-Types of Reactions examples
Ch7-Net Ionic/Precipitation examples


09/26/19


7.5-7.8


Ch7-Stoichiometry
Ch7-Stoichiometry examples
Ch7-Limiting Reactants examples
Ch7-percent yield


10/01/19

Exam 2





10/03/19


8.1-8.4


Ch8-Gas Laws
Ch
8-Gas Laws Examples

Ch. 8, ppt

10/08/19


9.1-9.3


Ch9-Thermochemistry
Ch9-Heating curve
Ch9-Specific heat
Ch9-Enthalpy



Ch. 9, ppt

10/10/19




classes canceled


10/14/19-
10/15/19

Fall Break

10/17/19


10.1-10.4


Ch10-Intermolecular forces
Ch9-Thermochemistry
Ch9-Heating curve

Ch. 10, ppt

10/18/19

Last day to drop full semester course

10/22/19


10.4-6


Phase diagrams


10/24/19

Exam 3





10/29/19


12.1-12.3


Ch12-Thermodynamics
enthalpy and entropy

Ch. 12, ppt

10/31/19


12.4-12.7


Ch12-Free energy and sponteneity


11/05/19


13.1-13.4


Ch13-Kinetics

Ch. 13, ppt

11/07/19


13.6




11/12/19

Exam 4





11/14/19


14.1-14.10


Ch14-Equilibrium

Ch. 14, ppt

11/19/19


15.1, 15.8


Ch15-Acids/Bases

Ch. 15, ppt

11/21/19

Exam 5





11/26/19






12/07/19

FINAL EXAM


8:00 AM Saturday in SIMS 105 for section 002, (8:00am class)